Retribution

covwor

(The breakthrough of Habakkuk’s vision)

It will tarry

Wait for it

But I will surely see

The rising of

A righteous God

To set the captives free.

He rolls right o’er

The war-horse rage

The rivers

And the waves

Pays back in full

For robbery

And from the godless saves.

I struggle

With each passing month

I plead, I plod, I pine

How long will evil

Hold the day?

With idols

And with wine?

And who can halt

Momentum dark

Their rape and gluttons’ will?

The Lord sees

From His Holy Mount

Let all the earth be still.

And we are chastened

By the blows

Remembering better days

When holy walk

And holy words

Filled each Jew’s heart

With praise.

Oh will we ever laugh again

And trust whate’er befall?

The Lord who sanctifies

The meek

Will soon revive us all.

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4 thoughts on “Retribution

  1. I find it incredibly awesome how Christ is with us in so many ways that are, for the lack of a better term, deceptively relevant. I do not mean that in the way that intends to ‘deceive,’ per se, but similar to the way a parent will always be behind their child as they learn to walk. That there is a support towards nourishing their upright ways, that is visible in the times a parent will catch their child and equally invisible in the times they must accept their child must fall, so as to learn. I say this in regards to the work above, because I gather the invisible Christ-like retribution in the midst of this war-torn theme and how it bears on last weeks scripture; Mat 25:40 “‘Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.”
    I find it fascinating that we American’s enjoy the graces of this country and yet in our gratitude I have seen many poets and writers express a, kind-of, ‘survivors guilt’. A great unworthiness recognizes that so many suffer in our world and we seem powerless to help, though in our blessings we desperately want to help. It does seem important to never lose sight of how many suffer in this world, so that we may pray for them. And I believe our prayers do have an effect but is very difficult to see. I have not intent to deny that there are people in our world who suffer, daily, unimaginable atrocities and I wish it would stop, but like being saved from a drunk driver coming down the same road as my children, the fact is I do not ‘know’ they were just saved because nothing bad happened. Nothing happened at all to alert me to the idea that my children have just been saved and I wonder if this true of these war-torn countries. We see so much pain and we [I] wonder if the pain attests to the idea that, perhaps, God is indifferent to their suffering. But I imagine that God is more ‘deceptively’ present there than any other place except we don’t ‘know’ the many instances God averted another crime on top of the victimization that is prevalent within these spheres. I wonder, and I may never know for sure [perhaps we are never meant to know for sure], that if it weren’t for our prayers given to these suffering souls, if their lives could be worse. I believe they know, more than we do, that there are worse things than death.

    Your work above has allowed me access to these mediations and I pray it is worthy of God. Many blessings. WL

    1. Wow thank you Friend for these weighty yet reassuring comments. The bafflement of Habakkuk has occupied me now for several days. But that one promise gains the ascendency. ‘Intimate knowledge of God’s Glory will cover the earth as waters cover the sea.’

      1. I had to look up this Old Testament book, the name is intriguing, Habakkuk. I wonder what it sounds like Hebrew and not with an English twang that sounds more like “the fresh catch of the day” and not a name meant to give pause, the “fertile silence” mentioned earlier.
        After reading Habakkuk for the first time, I can see that much of human behavior has not changed; a, seemingly, unstoppable and senseless destructive force, along side the idea that the suffering and pain reveals Gods indifference. But like most scripture, I bet after reading it again and again, and from the Catholic source as well as the Jewish Study Bible, that there might be more to extract from this text. Thank you for the name, I believe it was not from mere coincidence and perhaps I should be paying attention.

      2. Don’t you forget this prophet. The 3rd chapter is one of the most powerful statements of undaunted faith to be found in all of scripture. If you are drawn to the Minor Prophets, you might also want to go to Zephaniah chapter 3. Heaven gets really appealing there! Doug

        I have something for you

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